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September 27, 2005

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference China: Fear of Smartmobs:

» CHINA'S WEB from Clive Davis
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One of the dumber memes online. Kopel: U.S. Web firms aid in repression. Yahoo! is so enthusiastic to comply with "local law" - however tyrannical and unjust - that in 2002 Yahoo! signed the "Public Pledge on Self-Discipline for... [Read More]

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One of the dumber memes online. Kopel: U.S. Web firms aid in repression. Yahoo! is so enthusiastic to comply with "local law" - however tyrannical and unjust - that in 2002 Yahoo! signed the "Public Pledge on Self-Discipline for... [Read More]

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Comments

tim

Funny, I was just reading about how the mongols were overthrown by mobs passing information in moon cakes. There has been a long histroy of such overthrows in China fear of the people is simply the first step.

TM Lutas

You state that there is no alternative leadership available. This is not entirely correct. A quite capable one exists just off the mainland's shores. If peaceful reunification were put on the table in exchange for the legalization of the KMT throughout the PRC, you would have a very interesting conundrum. The CCP would have to either:
1. give up its monopoly on power
2. give up any pretense that peaceful reunification can happen.

It would probably take a decade for the KMT to be trusted enough by the people to run the country but the benefits to united China would be immense and immediate. The PRC would be a multi-party democracy and would be free of the stigma of dictatorship. All Taiwanese institutions would cease being the subject of intense pressure against them on the international stage. The KMT mandarins would gain a great deal of power. The entire map of Asia would change to China's benefit. Finally, but probably most importantly, this would allow the current leadership to take their money and retire without much fear of a neck-stretching party in the future.

Inquisitor

The imperial authorities made a mistake in allowing anti-Japanese protests as this reminded the Chinese that their relevant orfices could be used for purposes other than consumption. (thus, the myriad of items on the chinese menu.) They obviously realised that such a weapon, not unlike Al Qaeda, when used against others may soon be turned against them if they realise that the authority being Chinese little distinguishes oppression and murder from any other authority. The unhappiness over the current legislation is not unlike that faced by the Imperial authority in the Chin dynasty after the intellectual vibrance of the preceding Chou era.

Perhaps this might gradually awaken them from their millenia long intellectual stupor.

Inquisitor

The overthrowing of authority in China has never been equated by the Chinese with overthrowing of the system. The chinese have never questioned the right of Chinese authority to kill them en masse - only the right of Non-chinese to do it. That is why the Nanking massacre takes up so much of the cultural indignation as opposed to the mass murder which has taken place in China regularly throughout their history. This is related to the idea of the 'Mandate of Heaven' which basically stipulates that a ruler has lost the mandate of heaven when there are many natural calamities and when the ruler is unable to suppress dissent. Thus, to the Chinese, the sign of a legitimate ruler is one who maintains his rule by any means necessary. This is replicated throughout chinese society, be it in the work area or family.

Stan

The Wall Street Journal has an article by Geoffrey A. Fowler and Mei Fong on China's new restrictions on Internet use, especially blogging. It's grim. In the second to last paragraph they have a sentence that I think perfectly defines a divide in thoug...

Ruckus

One of the dumber memes online. Kopel: U.S. Web firms aid in repression. Yahoo! is so enthusiastic to comply with "local law" - however tyrannical and unjust - that in 2002 Yahoo! signed the "Public Pledge on Self-Discipline for

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