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October 10, 2005

Comments

Joseph Wang

Something to keep in mind is that what Lu Banglie has been fighting for is to make sure simply that the laws are enforced and that people know what they can do under Chinese law. If Beijing really didn't like what was going on, they could change the law to make impeachment impossible, and if the Central Government considered Lu Banglie a threat to either the Communist Party or the state, he'd be in jail in about thirty seconds.

Something else that should be called attention to is that Lu Banglie seems to be get beat up a lot, but there don't seem to be any guns anywhere. There is a reason for that. Basically to use deadly force requires using the People's Armed Police and that requires authorization at the provincial government level.

Ordinary Chinese police are unarmed, and village and township heads are far too low to authorize the use of deadly force. There is also no way that a village or township head could allow non-police to use guns without their ending up in a huge amount of trouble.

Joseph Wang

FYI, Guardian has issued a clarification.

bobby fletcher

I certainly hope media will pay more attention to the broader issue Taishi brought to the open. Do you think our media would be interested in covering China's village recall elections in a more balanced, objective way than the case of BJW? Eg. report some good news such as successful impeachment?

http://www.cncitizen.org/article.php?articleid=148

While not trying to generalize 50+ cases of successful village impeachments, I believe it is something deserving careful consideration, as it will temper the "Taishi generalization" and hopefully help yield a more realistic picture of China's reality.

I too believe that the truth is somewhere in between, as others have expressed.

While I haven't found a complete list of village impeachments, I have found a number that's around 2000.

Here are few more examples of village impeachment that went on peacefully at least, and seemingly with laws observed, in addition to the 50 cases from cncitizen.org:

http://news.sohu.com/20/04/news146000420.shtml
温州282名村民罢免不受信任村干部
(Wenzhou 282 villagers impeach untrustworthy village committee)

http://news.qq.com/a/20051009/000962.htm
海南:村民不满土地发包作假罢免村干部
(Hainan: villagers dissatisfied with fraudulent land lease impeach
village committee)

http://bjyouth.ynet.com/article.jsp?oid=2957421
村民投票罢免村官
(Villager vote to impeach village official)

Here's an article on a failed impeachment bid, faulting local government of not following the law. Well, from of all places, People's Daily:

http://www.people.com.cn/GB/other4583/4592/6573/20020206/664199.html
赵兰庄村委会自1988年上任以后,几次操纵换届选举,不开村民会议,不公开投票,成员没有大的变动,工作实际上是连续的,怎么能说那些问题不是本届村委会造成­的?村民递交的罢免申请书,村里2386名有选举权的人都签名摁了手印,难道它就没有一点说服力吗?
(Since 1998 YueYangZuan Village committee took over, has repeatedly manipulated re-election, failed to hold village meetings, refused to publish ballots, resulting in little change in its membership. It's administration is in fact continuous, how can it say the problem is result of previous administration? In the Villager's impeachment petition, all 2386 qualified voters signed the petition, how can it not be compelling?)

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